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4oz Soap / 8oz Shampoo
$6.50

Remember my soap will outlast several bars of commercial detergent soap!!!
!!You will not find a better soap!!

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Lavander Essential Oil Swiss Goat Milk Soap

Here is some info about Lavander, the plant and the oil.

Where Found

Lavender is a Mediterranean shrub which is cultivated for its aromatic flowers in the United States and Europe.
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Medicinal Properties

Antispasmodic, aromatic, carminative, cholagogue, diuretic, sedative, stimulant, stomachic, tonic, relaxant, antibacterial, antiseptic

Legends, Myths and Stories

One of the most popular medicinal herbs since ancient times; in Arab medicine, it is used as an expectorant and an antispasmodic. In European folk tradition it is used as a wound herb and a worm medicine for children.

The name lavender comes from the Latin, lavare, to wash and refers to the Roman custom of scenting bath water with the leaves and flowers of this aromatic plant. Used in perfumes, soaps, and sachets.

The early Romans used this herb to scent their public baths.

Uses

Used as a nerve tonic, cough cure and anti-paralytic, gargle, mouth-wash for halitosis and improve the gums. An essential oil of lavender, for external application, (no essential oil should ever be taken internally), soothes headaches, migraines, cold sores, dizziness, reduces inflammation, fever, and calms angry joints and muscles.

Used in moderation, lavender may be taken as a mild sedative and to relieve fainting spells. Tea steeped from the flowers is a tonic. Prevents fainting and stops nausea.

A decoction of the leaves is a useful remedy for stomach problems, nausea and vomiting. Once treated dropsy, epilepsy, cramps, convulsions, palsy, toothache.

In aromatherapy, lavender oil is used to promote relaxation, relieve anxiety, and treat headaches. A traditional remedy for gassy stomach.

Sometimes used to keep moths away. Not used medicinally much today. Lavender has long been known as a sachet, making perfumes, and delicate flavoring for beverages, cakes, muffins, and fruit soups. Lavender flowers were once used for centuries to preserve linens from insects and leave them with a fresh, clean scent.

 

 

 

 

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